Severs Disease Physiotherapy

Overview

Severs Disease is a common cause of heel pain in children. It is seen most commonly in children aged 5 - 11 years old. Children with Severs Disease will complain of heel pain that increases with activity. The pain is often relieved by rest, although some children will continue to have pain with regular activities, such as walking. Severs Disease has much in common with Osgood-Schlatter Disease. Both are described as being a traction apophysitis.

Causes

Sever disease is more common in children who do regular sports or exercise that puts pressure on the heels. Activities such as running and jumping can put stress on the tight muscles and tendons.

Symptoms

Symptoms of Sever?s disease, mostly pain at the back of heel, usually occur during and after sporting activity, and usually disappear with rest. In some cases, children may find it difficult to place pressure on their heels, and begin walking on their toes to gain relief. For some children, the heel pain will persist until the next morning, causing some stiffness or hobbling on first arising. Some children may experience mild swelling at the back of the heel.

Diagnosis

To diagnose the cause of the child?s heel pain and rule out other more serious conditions, the foot and ankle surgeon obtains a thorough medical history and asks questions about recent activities. The surgeon will also examine the child?s foot and leg. X-rays are often used to evaluate the condition. Other advanced imaging studies and laboratory tests may also be ordered.

Non Surgical Treatment

If your child suffers from Sever?s Disease, it is important you take him or her to see your podiatrist, as it can take some time for the condition to completely resolve. Possible treatment options for Sever?s disease may include. Rest from aggravating activities. Ice massage to reduce localised inflammation. Heel lifts placed inside the shoe to reduce the strain on the growth plate. Athletic footwear advice, poor footwear can sometimes be the major contributing factor in the development of Sever?s disease. Orthotic therapy, if your child has an abnormal foot posture that is contributing to the development of Sever?s disease, this will need to be treated with orthotic therapy. Orthotics for Sever?s disease may need to be prescription (custom-made) or non-prescription foot orthotics depending on your child?s foot posture, Exercise program, stretching exercises to improve flexibility of the leg muscles and strengthening exercises to address any foot muscle weakness or imbalance. Avoid barefoot walking, hill running and training on hard surfaces.

Surgical Treatment

The surgeon may select one or more of the following options to treat calcaneal apophysitis. Reduce activity. The child needs to reduce or stop any activity that causes pain. Support the heel. Temporary shoe inserts or custom orthotic devices may provide support for the heel. Medications. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, help reduce the pain and inflammation. Physical therapy. Stretching or physical therapy modalities are sometimes used to promote healing of the inflamed issue. Immobilization. In some severe cases of pediatric heel pain, a cast may be used to promote healing while keeping the foot and ankle totally immobile. Often heel pain in children returns after it has been treated because the heel bone is still growing. Recurrence of heel pain may be a sign of calcaneal apophysitis, or it may indicate a different problem. If your child has a repeat bout of heel pain, be sure to make an appointment with your foot and ankle surgeon.

Write a comment

Comments: 0